A tailored mindfulness-based program for resident physicians: A qualitative study.

Affiliation

Aeschbach VM(1), Fendel JC(2), Schmidt S(3), Göritz AS(2).
Author information:
(1)Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Hauptstraße 8, 79104, Freiburg, Germany; Department of Occupational and Consumer Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Engelbergerstraße 41, 79106, Freiburg, Germany. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Department of Occupational and Consumer Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Freiburg, Engelbergerstraße 41, 79106, Freiburg, Germany.
(3)Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Hauptstraße 8, 79104, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Diminished well-being is prevalent in resident physicians. This qualitative study explored the effects of a tailored mindfulness-based program (MBP) aimed at increasing resident physicians' well-being. A second goal was to compare the MBP with an active control group. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted interviews with 35 resident physicians: 21 physicians attended an eight-week MBP (intervention group) and 14 physicians received text-based information about mindfulness for self-study (control group). The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Participants in the intervention group reported that the MBP helped them integrate mindfulness into their everyday life, increased their self-awareness, equanimity and well-being, and had positive effects on their self-care and interactions with patients. In the control group, the perceived effects were minor. CONCLUSION: A tailored mindfulness-based program can help resident physicians care for their own well-being during medical residency and can have positive effects on their interactions with patients.