Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia in the first remission: outcomes using haploidentical donors are similar to those using matched siblings.

Affiliation

Ma YR(1), Xu LP(1), Zhang XH(1), Liu KY(1), Chang YJ(1), Lv M(1), Yan CH(1), Chen YH(1), Han W(1), Wang FR(1), Mo XD(1), Huang XJ(1)(2), Wang Y(3).
Author information:
(1)Peking University People's Hospital, Peking University Institute of Hematology, National Clinical Research Center for Hematologic Disease, Research Unit of Key Technique for Diagnosis and Treatments of Hematologic Malignancies, Beijing Key Laboratory of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Peking University, No 11 Xizhimen South Street, Beijing, 100044, China.
(2)Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Beijing, China.
(3)Peking University People's Hospital, Peking University Institute of Hematology, National Clinical Research Center for Hematologic Disease, Research Unit of Key Technique for Diagnosis and Treatments of Hematologic Malignancies, Beijing Key Laboratory of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Peking University, No 11 Xizhimen South Street, Beijing, 100044, China. [Email]

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is an effective and curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We explored the outcome of haploidentical donor (HID) transplantation for intermediate-risk AML and compared to that of matched sibling donor (MSD) transplants. One hundred twenty-seven consecutive patients with intermediate-risk AML in the first complete remission (CR1) who underwent allo-HSCT between January 1, 2015, and August 1, 2016, were enrolled. Thirty-seven patients received MSD grafts, and 90 received HID grafts. The 2-year leukemia-free survival (LFS) of the HID group was comparable to that of the MSD group: 82.0% ± 4.1% versus 82.7% ± 6.4%, P = 0.457. The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse and transplantation-related mortality (TRM) were comparable between the HID and MSD groups (relapse, 4.5% ± 0.1%, versus 11.5% ± 0.3%, P = 0.550; TRM, 13.4% ± 0.1% vs. 5.8% ± 0.2%, P = 0.154). The HID recipients had a trend of a lower 2-year cumulative incidence of positive posttransplant flow cytometry (FCM+) and relapse than the MSD recipients (5.6% ± 0.1% vs. 19.9% ± 0.5%, P = 0.092). These results suggest that the outcomes of allo-HSCT with HIDs are comparable to those with MSDs in terms of LFS, TRM, and relapse for intermediate-risk AML in CR1. HIDs could be an alternative to MSDs for intermediate-risk AML.