An audit of MRI machines and services in Ghana.

Affiliation

Ofori EK(1), Angmorterh SK(2), Ofori-Manteaw BB(3), Acheampong F(4), Aboagye S(5), Yarfi C(6).
Author information:
(1)Department of Medical Imaging, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Department of Medical Imaging, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana. Electronic address: https://twitter.com/SethKwadjo.
(3)Department of Medical Imaging, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana. Electronic address: https://twitter.com/brytebarca.
(4)Department of Basic Sciences, School of Basic & Biomedical Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana.
(5)Department of Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana.
(6)Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Health and Allied Sciences
(UHAS), Ho, Ghana.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful medical imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of patients. However, the huge costs associated with establishing and operating MRI means it may not be readily accessible and affordable for hospitals in developing countries. Little is currently known about the availability of MRI machines in Ghana. Such information may assist in informing future health service development within the country. This study reports on the findings and implications of an audit of MRI machines in Ghana. METHODS: A quantitative descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted involving all MRI machines in Ghana. Data obtained was analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 23. Independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the mean cost of MRI examinations between privately-owned and state-owned MRI machines in Ghana. RESULTS: 18 MRI machines, spread across five regions, are available in Ghana. 15 (83.3%) of the MRI machines are located in the Greater-Accra and Ashanti regions. MRI examinations are more expensive in privately-owned machines compared to state-owned machines (p < 0.05). Four state-owned machines have been non-operational for between three-six years resulting in a revenue loss of GHC 36 million (US$7.2 million). CONCLUSION: There are few MRI machines in Ghana and the majority are concentrated in the two largest regions. The increase in MRI machines over the past decade can be attributed to private investment in the sector. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This study will inform the Ghana Health Service and other healthcare policy makers in Ghana to increase investment in MRI machines to ensure equitable regional distribution of MRI machines so that patients across Ghana would have access to the diagnostic benefits associated with MRI machines.