Aqueous extract from leaves of Doliocarpus dentatus (Aubl.) Standl. relieves pain without genotoxicity activity.

Affiliation

Branquinho LS(1), Verdan MH(2), Santos ED(3), Neves SCD(4), Oliveira RJ(5), Cardoso CAL(6), Kassuya CAL(7).
Author information:
(1)School of Health Sciences, Federal University of Grande Dourados - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Postgraduate Program in Chemistry, Federal University of Grande Dourados - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)School of Health Sciences, Federal University of Grande Dourados - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(4)Federal University of Mato Grosso Do Sul - Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(5)Federal University of Mato Grosso Do Sul - Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(6)Postgraduate Program in Chemistry, Federal University of Grande Dourados - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil; Center of Studies in Natural Resources, State University of Mato Grosso Do Sul - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(7)School of Health Sciences, Federal University of Grande Dourados - Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: In the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, the watery sap of Doliocarpus dentatus is used to alleviate thirst, and the leaves of this species are used to relieve pain and swelling associated with inflammatory processes. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study aimed to analyze the compounds of the leaves from the aqueous extract of D. dentatus (EADd) and evaluate its toxicogenetic and pain relief effects in animal models. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Compounds were identified in EADd by UHPLC-HRMS (Ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry). The oral dose of 17 mg/kg EADd, calculated according to ethnopharmacological uses, and doses between 30 and 300 mg/kg were used to test Swiss mice in formalin- and acetic acid-induced models of pain and behavior. EADd (100-2000 mg/kg) was assayed in mice by comet, micronucleus, and phagocytosis tests and by peripheral leukocyte counts. RESULTS: Phenolic compounds and flavonoids as well as trigonelline and isoquercetin were identified in EADd. All oral doses of EADd exhibited antinociceptive activity, as indicated by a decrease in pain in both phases, a decrease in cold hypersensitivity induced by formalin, and a decrease in abdominal contortions induced by acetic acid. EADd did not alter the exploratory, motor or motivational activities of the animals. The comet and micronucleus tests indicated that EADd was not genotoxic and did not change the phagocytic activity or peripheral leukocyte count. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that EADd could act as an antinociceptive agent that does not present genotoxicity. This study should contribute to justifying, in part, the popular use of D. dentatus in pain management, ensuring its safe use.