Assembly of a Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase multicomponent system from Phenylobacterium immobile E DSM 1986 enables pyrazon cis-dihydroxylation in E. coli.

Affiliation

Hunold A(1), Escobedo-Hinojosa W(1), Potoudis E(1), Resende D(1), Farr T(1), Syrén PO(2)(3), Hauer B(4).
Author information:
(1)Institute of Biochemistry and Technical Biochemistry, Department of Technical Biochemistry, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 31, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany.
(2)School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Division of Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden.
(3)Science for Life Laboratory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 171 21, Stockholm, Sweden.
(4)Institute of Biochemistry and Technical Biochemistry, Department of Technical Biochemistry, University of Stuttgart, Allmandring 31, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany. [Email]

Abstract

Phenylobacterium immobile strain E is a soil bacterium with a striking metabolism relying on xenobiotics, such as the herbicide pyrazon, as sole carbon source instead of more bioavailable molecules. Pyrazon is a heterocyclic aromatic compound of environmental concern and its biodegradation pathway has only been reported in P. immobile. The multicomponent pyrazon oxygenase (PPO), a Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase, incorporates molecular oxygen at the 2,3 position of the pyrazon phenyl moiety as first step of degradation, generating a cis-dihydrodiendiol. The aim of this work was to identify the genes encoding for each one of the PPO components and enable their functional assembly in Escherichia coli. P. immobile strain E genome sequencing revealed genes encoding for RO components, such as ferredoxin-, reductase-, α- and β-subunits of an oxygenase. Though, P. immobile E displays three prominent differences with respect to the ROs currently characterized: (1) an operon-like organization for PPO is absent, (2) all the elements are randomly scattered in its DNA, (3) not only one, but 19 different α-subunits are encoded in its genome. Herein, we report the identification of the PPO components involved in pyrazon cis-dihydroxylation in P. immobile, its appropriate assembly, and its functional reconstitution in E. coli. Our results contributes with the essential missing pieces to complete the overall elucidation of the PPO from P. immobile. KEY POINTS: • Phenylobacterium immobile E DSM 1986 harbors the only described pyrazon oxygenase (PPO). • We elucidated the genes encoding for all PPO components. • Heterologous expression of PPO enabled pyrazon dihydroxylation in E. coli JW5510.