Bioaugmentation of treatment wetlands - A review.

Affiliation

Tondera K(1), Chazarenc F(2), Chagnon PL(3), Brisson J(4).
Author information:
(1)INRAE, REVERSAAL, F-69625 Villeurbanne, France; IMT Atlantique Bretagne-Pays de Loire, Department of Energy Systems and Environment, 44307 Nantes, France. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)INRAE, REVERSAAL, F-69625 Villeurbanne, France. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)Institut de recherche en biologie végétale, Département de sciences biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. Electronic address: [Email]
(4)Institut de recherche en biologie végétale, Département de sciences biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Bioaugmentation in the form of artificial mycorrhization of plant roots and bacterial inoculation has been successfully implemented in several fields including soil remediation or activated sludge treatment. Likewise, bioaugmentation seems a promising approach to improve the functioning of treatment wetlands, considering that natural mycorrhization has been detected in treatment wetlands and that bacteria are the main driver of contaminant degradation processes. However, to date, full scale implementation seems to be rare. This review synthesizes the effects of bioaugmentation on different types of treatment wetlands, to a large extent performed on a microcosm (<0.5 m2) or mesocosm scale (0.51 to 5 m2). While inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi tended to show a positive effect on the growth of some wetland plants (e.g. Phragmites australis), the mechanisms underlying such positive effects are not well understood and the effects of upscaling to full scale treatment wetlands remain unknown. Bacterial inoculation tended to promote plant growth and pollutant degradation, but longer term data is required.