Cardiac sympathetic denervation and mental health.

Affiliation

Khalsa SS(1), Clausen AN(2), Shahabi L(3), Sorg J(4), Gonzalez SE(4), Naliboff B(5), Shivkumar K(4), Ajijola OA(4).
Author information:
(1)Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, United States of America; Oxley College of Health Sciences, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, United States of America. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Department of Behavioral Health, Kansas City VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, United States of America; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, United States of America.
(3)Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America; Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
(4)Neurocardiology Research Center of Excellence, Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
(5)Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America; Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America; Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bilateral cardiac sympathetic denervation (BCSD) is a surgical treatment for refractory ventricular arrhythmias. Although the procedure has shown efficacy at reducing cardiac arrhythmias, its impact on mental health is unknown. In the current study we examined associations between the BCSD procedure and mental health. METHODS: 10 ventricular arrhythmia patients undergoing BCSD completed assessments of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms at pre- and post-BCSD time points. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to examine differences in mental health symptoms in the pre- and post-BSCD states. Point biserial correlations were used to explore associations between BCSD response and mental health symptoms. RESULTS: A significant reduction of anxiety symptoms was observed from pre- to post-BCSD. At the post-BCSD assessment, participants who successfully responded to the BCSD procedure exhibited lower anxiety symptoms compared to non-responders. However, no significant relationships were identified for depressive or PTSD symptoms. CONCLUSION: The BCSD procedure is associated with reduced anxiety shortly after successful treatment for refractory ventricular arrhythmias in a small sample. Longitudinal surveillance of mental health symptoms after BCSD may be warranted to monitor the impact of this procedure on mental health.