Characteristics of indoor dust in an industrial city: Comparison with outdoor dust and atmospheric particulates.

Affiliation

Zhou L(1), Liu G(2), Shen M(3), Liu Y(3), Lam PKS(4).
Author information:
(1)CAS Key Laboratory of Crust-Mantle Materials and Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China; State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710075, China; State Key Laboratory of Marine Pollution
(SKLMP), Department of Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China; Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou, Jiangsu, 215123, China.
(2)CAS Key Laboratory of Crust-Mantle Materials and Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China; State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710075, China. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)CAS Key Laboratory of Crust-Mantle Materials and Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China.
(4)State Key Laboratory of Marine Pollution
(SKLMP), Department of Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China.

Abstract

There is a considerable connection between indoor and outdoor environments. However, few studies have explored their intrinsic relationship until now. This study conducted morphologic observation, heavy metal monitoring and isotopes analysis in indoor and outdoor dust, as well as the atmospheric particulates in Hefei. Morphologic analysis demonstrated atmospheric particulates were affected by fly ash and construction, road dust mainly came from automobile exhaust and indoor dust particles were interfered by multiple sources, including the secondary reaction of fly ash. Chemical speciation analysis of heavy metals showed the exchange of heavy metals between atmospheric particulates and indoor dust was dominated by non-residual metals, while the exchange between road dust and indoor dust tended to rely on residual metals. The assessment results of heavy metals in particulates showed that indoor carcinogenic risks were greater than outdoor for children, however, for adults, outdoor carcinogenic risks were greater than indoor. Stable isotopes analysis indicated carbon in the dust outside buildings was derived from flying dust, and atmospheric particulates might derive from vehicle exhaust, or partly from natural gas. While sulfur in atmospheric particulates was derived mainly from coal combustion. The release from indoor activities, especially natural gas exhaust emitted from cooking had a certain impact on atmospheric particulates.