Common mental disorders among seasonal migrant farmworkers in Northwest Ethiopia.

Affiliation

Gelaye KA(1), Sisay MM(2), Akalu TY(1), Teshome DF(1), Wolde HF(1), Demissie GD(3), Wami SD(4), Azale T(3), Ayele TA(1).
Author information:
(1)Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
(2)Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia. [Email]
(3)Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
(4)Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Seasonal migrant farmworkers in Ethiopia are a vulnerable segment of the population facing numerous threats to their mental health. This research aimed to determine the magnitude of common mental disorders (CMDs) and its associated factors among seasonal migrant farmworkers in the northwest of Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 950 seasonal migrant farmworkers were selected randomly. CMDs were assessed using the self-reporting questionnaire (SRQ-20) and a structured questionnaire was employed to collect the associated characteristics of socio-demographic data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariable binary logistic regression. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with a 95% confidence level was used to declare a statistically significant association with CMDs. RESULTS: The prevalence of CMDs was found to be 23.05% (219/950; 95% CI 20.47-25.84) among seasonal migrant farmworkers. The prevalence of psychological stress was 74.53% (708/950; 95% CI 71.65-77.20). Having a daily income below USD 5 (AOR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.10-2.15), moderate perceived stress (AOR = 3.18, 95% CI: 1.18, 5.36), severe perceived stress (AOR = 16.15, 95% CI: 8.96, 29.11), and heat-related illness (AOR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.30) were associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing CMD. On the other hand, those seasonal migrant farmworkers who migrated for the first time (AOR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.23-0.65) and those who received health related information (AOR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42, 0.85) were less likely to have CMDs. CONCLUSION: In this study, CMDs were found to be prevalent among seasonal migrant farmworkers. These findings highlight the importance of systematic development of community-based mental health services in combination with rural primary health care centers and an integrated approach to the health care of farmworkers such as screening, early identification, and treatment of CMDs of seasonal migrant farmworkers.