Cost-effectiveness of individual versus group female-specific cognitive behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder.

Affiliation

Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin, 2300 Red River Street, Austin, TX 78713, United States of America. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE : To determine the relative cost-effectiveness of individual female-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (I-FS-CBT) versus group female-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (G-FS-CBT).
METHODS : This cost-effectiveness study is based on a randomized controlled trial in which 155 women seeking treatment for alcohol use disorder at an academic outpatient clinic were randomized to 12 manual-guided sessions of I-FS-CBT (n = 75) or G-FS-CBT (n = 80). The primary patient outcomes were the number of drinking days and the number of heavy drinking days during the 12-week treatment and 1-year follow-up periods. All cost data (including resource utilizations) were collected prospectively alongside the trial. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were used to determine the cost-effectiveness of I-FS-CBT relative to G-FS-CBT. Results are presented from the provider perspective.
RESULTS : During the 12-week treatment period, G-FS-CBT is likely to be cost-effective when the threshold value to decision-makers of one fewer drinking day (or one fewer day of heavy drinking) is less than $141 (or $258), and I-FS-CBT is likely to be cost-effective if the threshold is greater than $141 (or $258). During the 1-year follow-up period, G-FS-CBT is likely to be cost-effective when the threshold value to decision-makers of one fewer drinking day (or one fewer day of heavy drinking) is less than $54 (or $169), and I-FS-CBT is likely to be cost-effective if the threshold is greater than $54 (or $169). The results are robust to sensitivity analyses on several key cost parameters.
CONCLUSIONS : Compared to I-FS-CBT, G-FS-CBT holds promise as a cost-effective approach, in both the short run and the long run, for improving drinking outcomes of women with alcohol use disorder.

Keywords

Alcohol use disorder,Cognitive behavioral therapy,Cost effectiveness,Female specific therapy,Women,