Development of a nanobody-based ELISA for the detection of the insecticides cyantraniliprole and chlorantraniliprole in soil and the vegetable bok choy.

Affiliation

Xu B(1), Wang K(1), Vasylieva N(2), Zhou H(1), Xue X(1), Wang B(3), Li QX(4), Hammock BD(2), Xu T(5).
Author information:
(1)Beijing Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Organic Farming, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.
(2)Department of Entomology and UCD Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, California, 95616, USA.
(3)College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.
(4)Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1955 East-West Road, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96822, USA.
(5)Beijing Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Organic Farming, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China. [Email]

Abstract

Cyantraniliprole and chlorantraniliprole are anthranilic diamide insecticides acting on ryanodine receptors. In this study, two camel-derived nanobodies (Nbs, named C1 and C2) recognizing cyantraniliprole as well as chlorantraniliprole were generated. C1-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of the two insecticides were developed. The half-maximum signal inhibition concentrations (IC50) of cyantraniliprole and chlorantraniliprole by ELISA were 1.2 and 1.5 ng mL-1, respectively. This assay was employed to detect these two insecticides in soil and vegetables. The average recoveries of cyantraniliprole from both bok choy (Brassica chinensis L.) and soil samples were 90-129%, while those of chlorantraniliprole were in a range of 89-120%. The insecticide residues in soil and bok choy, which were collected from plots sprayed with cyantraniliprole and chlorantraniliprole, were simultaneously detected by the resulting ELISA and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, showing a satisfactory correlation. Higher concentrations of chlorantraniliprole than cyantraniliprole were detected in soil and vegetables, which indicates the longer persistence of chlorantraniliprole in the environment.