Differences in circulating fatty acid-binding protein 4 concentration in the venous and capillary blood immediately after acute exercise.

Affiliation

Numao S(1), Uchida R(2), Kurosaki T(2), Nakagaichi M(2).
Author information:
(1)Department of Sports and Life Sciences, National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, 1 Shiromizu, Kanoya, Kagoshima, 891-2393, Japan. [Email]
(2)Department of Sports and Life Sciences, National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya, 1 Shiromizu, Kanoya, Kagoshima, 891-2393, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Circulating fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a marker for various diseases. It would be highly useful to have simple and less invasive techniques for the assessment of FABP4 concentrations in the clinical research setting. The purpose of the present study was to assess the concordance of circulating FABP4 concentrations in venous and capillary blood both at rest and immediately after acute exercise in healthy young males. RESULTS: Thirty-eight healthy young male adults aged from 19 to 25 years (mean age, 20.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited. Paired blood samples were taken from the cubital vein (venous) and fingertip (capillary) blood at rest (resting state) and immediately after incremental exercise (exercising state). Blood samples were analyzed to determine the circulating FABP4 concentration using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pearson's correlation coefficients for circulating FABP4 concentrations between venous and capillary blood samples indicated a strong positive correlation in both the resting and exercising state (resting state: r = 0.982, exercising state: r = 0.989, both p < 0.001). The mean FABP4 concentration was similar between venous and capillary blood in the resting state (p = 0.178), whereas it was significantly higher in capillary blood than in venous blood in the exercising state (p < 0.001). Furthermore, Bland-Altman plots showed a non-significant bias (- 0.07 ± 0.61 ng/mL, p = 0.453) in the resting state, whereas a significant bias (- 0.45 ± 0.61 ng/mL, p < 0.001) was observed in the exercising state. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that capillary blood sampling can slightly overestimate circulating FABP4 concentrations under a physiologically dynamic state. However, the association between the venous and capillary blood in terms of FABP4 concentration was very strong, suggesting that capillary blood sampling can detect changes in FABP4 concentration in both physiologically steady and dynamic states.