Different patterns of β-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease according to the presence of mild parkinsonism.

Affiliation

Chung SJ(1), Lee S(2), Yoo HS(3), Baik K(3), Lee HS(4), Jung JH(3), Choi Y(2), Hong JM(1), Kim YJ(1), Ye BS(3), Sohn YH(3), Yun M(2), Lee PH(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Neurology, Yongin Severance Hospital, Yonsei University Health System, Yongin, South Korea.
(2)Department of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
(3)Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
(4)Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
(5)Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

This study aimed to compare the patterns of β-amyloid deposition between patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) with mild parkinsonism and those without parkinsonism. Sixty-one patients with early-stage AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR], 0.5 or 1) who underwent 18F-florbetaben (18F-FBB) PET scans were enrolled. We performed comparative analyses of regional FBB uptake in the frontal, parietal, lateral temporal, medial temporal, occipital, anterior cingulate, and posterior cingulate cortices and in the precuneus, striatum, and thalamus between AD patients with mild parkinsonism (AD-p+; n = 23) and those without parkinsonism (AD-p-; n = 38). There was no significant difference in age, sex, years of education, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and white matter hyperintensity severity between groups. The AD-p+ group had lower composite scores in frontal/executive function domain than the AD-p- group. The AD-p+ group had a higher FBB uptake in the occipital cortex, but not in other cortical regions, than the AD-p- group. Our findings suggest that additional β-amyloid deposition in the occipital region is associated with mild parkinsonism in early-stage AD.