Effect of Fluoride in Drinking Water on Fecal Microbial Community in Rats.

Affiliation

Zhong N(1), Ma Y(1), Meng X(1), Sowanou A(1), Wu L(2), Huang W(2), Gao Y(2), Pei J(3).
Author information:
(1)Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & National Health Commission
(23618504), Institute for Kaschin-Beck Disease Control, Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, Heilongjiang Province, China.
(2)Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & National Health Commission
(23618504), Institute for Fluorosis Disease Control, Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, Heilongjiang Province, China.
(3)Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & National Health Commission
(23618504), Institute for Kaschin-Beck Disease Control, Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, 150081, Heilongjiang Province, China. [Email]

Abstract

Intestinal nutrition has a close association with the onset and development of fluorosis. Intestinal microbes play a major role in intestinal nutrition. However, the effect of fluoride on intestinal microbes is still not fully understood. This study aimed to evaluate the dose-response of fluoride on fecal microbes as well as the link between fluorosis and fecal microbes. The results showed that fluoride did not significantly alter the diversity of fecal microbiota, but richness estimators (ACE and Chao) increased first, and then decreased with the increase of water fluoride. At the genus level, 150 mg/L fluoride significantly reduced the abundances of Roseburia and Clostridium sensu stricto, and 100 mg/L and 150 mg/L fluoride obviously increased the abundances of Unclassified Ruminococcaceaes and Unclassified Bdellovibrionales, respectively. The correlation analysis showed fluoride exposure had a negative association with Roseburia and Turicibacter and was positively associated with Pelagibacterium, Unclassified Ruminococcaceae, and Unclassified Bdellovibrionales. Dental fluorosis was negatively associated with Clostridium sensu stricto, Roseburia, Turicibacter, and Paenalcaligenes and had a positive association with Pelagibacterium, Unclassified Ruminococcaceae, and Unclassified Bdellovibrionales. In conclusion, this study firstly reports fluoride in drinking water has a remarkable biphasic effect on fecal microbiota in rats, and some bacteria are significantly associated with fluoride exposure and dental fluorosis. These results indicate the gut microbiota may play an important role in fluorosis, and some bacteria are likely to be developed as biomarkers for fluorosis.