Effects of the intake of craft or industrial beer on serum homocysteine.

Affiliation

Rossi F(1), Spigno G(2), Luzzani G(2), Bozzoni ME(3), Donadini G(1), Rolla J(4), Bertuzzi T(1).
Author information:
(1)Department of animal science, food and nutrition, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Catholic University, Piacenza, Italy.
(2)Department for sustainable food processing, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Catholic University, Piacenza, Italy.
(3)Kinesis srl, Piacenza, Italy.
(4)Ospedale G. da Saliceto, Piacenza, Italy.

Abstract

Beer is a source of folate, vitamin B6 and B12, molecules involved in the pathways of homocysteine (HCY), a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This research evaluated if a consumption of craft or industrial beer could reduce serum HCY. In a randomised cross-over study, 12 men (28.7 ± 6.0 years) and 12 women (29.4 ± 7.5 years), healthy, omnivorous, with normal body mass index, non-smoking and not taking oral supplements or contraceptives, followed a free-living diet and received, daily, for 3 weeks, 330 ml of industrial (4.5% of alcohol) or craft beer (9% of alcohol). Anthropometric measures and blood samples were taken at the beginning and at the end of each period. The consumption of industrial beer reduced (p < 0.05) HCY (7.35 vs. 6.50 µmol/L) and increased folic acid (3.46 vs. 3.94 ng/mL). Craft beer increased gamma-gluamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (16.6 vs. 18.6 U/L) and reduced vitamin B6 (20.9 vs. 16.9 ng/mL).