Electron Beam Susceptibility of Enteric Viruses and Surrogate Organisms on Fruit, Seed and Spice Matrices.

Affiliation

Butot S(1), Galbusera L(1), Putallaz T(1), Zuber S(2).
Author information:
(1)Nestlé Research, Institute of Food Safety and Analytical Science, 1000, 26, Lausanne, Switzerland.
(2)Nestlé Research, Institute of Food Safety and Analytical Science, 1000, 26, Lausanne, Switzerland. [Email]

Abstract

The objective of this study was to use high-energy electron beam (HEEB) treatments to find surrogate microorganisms for enteric viruses and to use the selected surrogates as proof of concept to investigate low-energy electron beam (LEEB) treatments for enteric virus inactivation at industrial scale on frozen blueberries. Six food matrices inoculated with HAV (hepatitis A virus), MNV S99 (murine norovirus), bacteriophages MS2 and Qβ, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were treated with HEEB at 10 MeV using 4, 8 and 16 kGy doses. G. stearothermophilus spores showed the highest inactivation on all matrices except on raisins, with a dose-dependent effect. HAV reached the maximum measurable log10 reduction (> 3.2 log10) when treated at 16 kGy on raisins. MNV showed the highest resistance of all tested microorganisms, independent of the dose, except on frozen blueberries. On frozen blueberries, freeze-dried raspberries, sesame seeds and black peppercorns, HAV showed a mean inactivation level in between those of MS2 and G. stearothermophilus. Based on this, we selected both surrogate organisms as first approximation to estimate HAV inactivation on frozen blueberries during LEEB treatment at 250 keV using 16 kGy. Reductions of 3.1 and 1.3 log10 were measured for G. stearothermophilus spores and MS2, respectively, suggesting that a minimum reduction of 1.4 log10 can be expected for HAV under the same conditions.