Emerging roles of Wss1 in the survival of Candida albicans under genotoxic stresses.

Affiliation

Homchan A(#)(1), Sukted J(#)(2), Matangkasombut O(3)(4), Pakotiprapha D(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Biochemistry and Center for Excellence in Protein and Enzyme Technology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand.
(2)Applied Biological Sciences Program, Chulabhorn Graduate Institute, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, Bangkok, 10210, Thailand.
(3)Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok, 10210, Thailand. [Email]
(4)Department of Microbiology and Research Unit on Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand. [Email]
(5)Department of Biochemistry and Center for Excellence in Protein and Enzyme Technology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 10400, Thailand. [Email]
(#)Contributed equally

Abstract

This perspective aims to discuss the potential physiological roles and regulation mechanisms of the recently identified Candida albicans Wss1 protease important in DNA-protein crosslink (DPC) tolerance and repair. DPC is a bulky DNA lesion that blocks essential DNA transactions; thus, it poses a significant threat to genome integrity if left unrepaired. Discoveries of Wss1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and SPRTN in human as DPC proteases have demonstrated the importance of protease function in DPC repair. Our recent study revealed that Wss1 in C. albicans, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals, also promotes DPC tolerance similarly to both S. cerevisiae Wss1 and human SPRTN. However, its molecular mechanism and regulation are still poorly understood. Here, we briefly discuss the recent insights into C. albicans Wss1 based on the information from S. cerevisiae, as well as outline the aspect of this protein that could make it a potential target for antifungal drug development.