Evaluation of physicochemical properties of Qinling Apis cerana honey and the antimicrobial activity of the extract against Salmonella Typhimurium LT(2) in vitro and in vivo.

Affiliation

Wang Y(1), Gou X(2), Yue T(2), Ren R(3), Zhao H(3), He L(3), Liu C(3), Cao W(4).
Author information:
(1)Department of Food Science, College of Food Science and Technology, Northwest University
(China) Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069, China; Laboratory of Nutritional and Healthy Food-Individuation Manufacturing Engineering, Shaanxi, Xi'an 710069, China; Research Center of Food Safety Risk Assessment and Control, Shaanxi, Xi'an 710069, China. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Department of Food Science, College of Food Science and Technology, Northwest University
(China) Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069, China; Laboratory of Nutritional and Healthy Food-Individuation Manufacturing Engineering, Shaanxi, Xi'an 710069, China; Research Center of Food Safety Risk Assessment and Control, Shaanxi, Xi'an 710069, China.
(3)Department of Food Science, College of Food Science and Technology, Northwest University
(China) Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069, China.
(4)Department of Food Science, College of Food Science and Technology, Northwest University
(China) Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069, China. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Apis cerana honey collected from the Qinling Mountains in China has been widely used for its antimicrobial property in traditional Chinese medicine. However, its antibacterial mechanism against Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 is still uncertain. A total of 52 volatile components were identified using headspace-gas-chromatography-ion-mobility, and Qinling A. cerana honey exhibited more abundant aromas than monofloral honeys. The phenolic extracts of honey sample F exhibited the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (5 mg/mL), and chlorogenic acid exhibited the highest (155.91 ± 0.79 mg/kg), followed by caffeic acid, and rutin. After being treated with the extract, cell membranes of S. Typhimurium LT2 significantly shrunk and further collapsed. The extract treatment on mice caused a significant decrease in S. Typhimurium LT2, and a dramatic increase in the potential prebiotic Lactobacillus in both the caecum and colon. The results demonstrate that the Qinling A. cerana honey extract could effectively inhibit S. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo.