Fluorescent image-based high-content screening of extracts of natural resources for cell cycle inhibitors and identification of a new sesquiterpene quinone from the sponge, Dactylospongia metachromia.

Affiliation

Hitora Y(1), Sejiyama A(1), Honda K(1), Ise Y(2), Losung F(3), Mangindaan REP(3), Tsukamoto S(4).
Author information:
(1)Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 862-0973, Japan.
(2)Sesoko Station, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, 3422 Sesoko, Motobu, Okinawa 905-0227, Japan.
(3)Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, Sam Ratulangi University, Kampus Bahu, Manado 95115, Indonesia.
(4)Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 862-0973, Japan. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Natural products are important sources for drug development. Discovery of natural products that inhibit cell cycle progression significantly contributes to the progress of cancer biology and the development of new antitumor agents. In this study, cell cycle inhibitory activity was evaluated with our extract library of natural resources, including marine invertebrates, fungi, and bacteria, using HeLa/Fucci2 cells which allow classification of the cell cycle phases of living cells. Screening of the extract library revealed that the extract of the marine sponge Dactylospongia metachromia inhibited cell cycle progression at S/G2/M phases. Bioassay-guided fractionation afforded a new sesquiterpene quinone, neoisosmenospongine (1), and four known compounds, nakijiquinone I, N, and Q (2-4) and (-)-dictyoceratin-C (5). The chemical structure of 1 was elucidated by interpretating the NMR and mass spectroscopic data, and the absolute configuration was determined by comparison of the experimental and calculated ECD spectra. Fluorescent imaging of HeLa/Fucci2 cells revealed that 1-4 inhibited the cell cycle progression at S/G2/M phases. This study demonstrated that fluorescent image-based high-content screening using HeLa/Fucci2 cells is an effective approach for isolating cell cycle inhibitors from natural resources.