[HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis care in intersectoral collaboration : Interim analysis of a monocentric, prospective study in Germany].

Affiliation

Interdisziplinäre Immunologische Ambulanz, Zentrum für Sexuelle Gesundheit und Medizin, Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bleichstraße 15, 44787, Bochum, Deutschland. [Email]

Abstract

BACKGROUND : HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a further opportunity to prevent HIV, is available at the WIR-Walk In Ruhr, Centre for Sexual Health and Medicine, as part of an innovative model project for intersectoral PrEP care.
OBJECTIVE : The present study describes the collective of persons provided with PrEP and how PrEP use influences sexual risk behaviour, the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and adverse drug reactions.
METHODS : A total of 139 men who started PrEP between 10/2017 and 12/2018 have been included in the study. During a period of 13 months of PrEP treatment, all PrEP users received questionnaires; side effects, HIV and other STI were also monitored via clinical laboratory examinations.
RESULTS : The participants' average age was 38 years and 98.6% of them were men who had sex with men (MSM). Most of them had a high educational background; the unemployment rate was low. The average number of sexual partners within the last 6 months increased significantly, while the use of condoms decreased. In all, 44 STI were found in 34 participants within the first 4 months. No one was infected with HIV. Within the first 4 weeks of PrEP, 38.8% of the participants suffered from side effects, mainly gastrointestinal symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS : Most of the participants were working in a job or a vocational training. The sexual risk behaviour increased in the course of using PrEP resulting in a high incidence of STD. Side effects appeared most frequently in the first few weeks after starting PrEP.

Keywords

Drug abuse,Drug-related side effects and adverse reactions,Men who have sex with men (MSM),Sexual risk behavior,Sexually transmitted diseases,

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