Identification of volatiles and odor-active compounds of aromatic rice by OSME analysis and SPME/GC-MS.

Affiliation

Dias LG(1), Hacke A(1), Bergara SF(2), Villela OV(3), Mariutti LRB(4), Bragagnolo N(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
(2)Sensel Consulting and Training in Sensory Analysis, Campinas, Brazil.
(3)São Paulo Agribusiness Technology Agency, Vale do Paraiba Regional Pole, Pindamonhangaba, Brazil.
(4)Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]
(5)Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Food Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

During cooking, aromatic rice has a pleasant and characteristic aroma, a relevant factor to add sale value and attract consumer interest. This work studied the volatile compounds of aromatic rice (IAC 500) aiming at identifying those responsible for the aroma and flavor of the cooked rice. The description of the aromatic notes of the IAC 500 rice was carried out by a trained and selected sensory panel, followed by olfactometry (OSME) and identification by GC-MS of the rice volatile compounds extracted by SPME. A total of 80 volatiles was sensorially perceived and/or detected in the chromatographic effluent, of which 65 were identified, 44 presented some odor, and 36 were odorless. Among the odorous compounds, 15 were not detected by GC-FID or GC-MS. This study confirmed the compound 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline as the impacting volatile compound to the aroma of aromatic rice since it presented a very low percentage of area in the chromatogram and a high odor intensity. Other 43 compounds presented odor in lower intensities, but also contributed to the overall aroma of IAC 500 rice. From the 11 aromatic notes mentioned by the trained panel (cooked vegetable/seed, corn, hominy, green, porridge, popcorn, fresh baked cake/bread, milk, caramel, tapioca flour and flower), eight were related to the volatile compounds responsible for their aroma.