Individuals with chronic ankle instability exhibit altered ankle kinematics and neuromuscular control compared to copers during inversion single-leg landing.

Affiliation

Watabe T(1), Takabayashi T(2), Tokunaga Y(3), Kubo M(4).
Author information:
(1)Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Institute for Human Movement and Medical Sciences, 1398 Shimami-cho, Kita-Ku, Niigata, 950-3198, Japan. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Institute for Human Movement and Medical Sciences, 1398 Shimami-cho, Kita-Ku, Niigata, 950-3198, Japan. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Institute for Human Movement and Medical Sciences, 1398 Shimami-cho, Kita-Ku, Niigata, 950-3198, Japan. Electronic address: [Email]
(4)Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Institute for Human Movement and Medical Sciences, 1398 Shimami-cho, Kita-Ku, Niigata, 950-3198, Japan. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the ankle kinematics and muscle activities of the individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI), coper, and control groups in normal and inversion single-leg landings. DESIGN: cross-sectional study; SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Physically active adults with CAI (N = 12); and coper (N = 12) and control (N = 12) groups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The participants performed normal and inversion single-leg landing. The muscle activity 200 ms before and after landing of the tibialis anterior, the medial gastrocnemius, and the fibularis longus (FL) were recorded. The FL latency, sagittal and frontal co-contraction indexes (CCI), ankle inversion angle at the initial contact, and the maximum inversion angle were recorded. RESULTS: Significantly longer FL latency, decreased FL muscle activity, frontal CCI, and an increased maximum inversion angle at post-landing were discovered during inversion single-leg landing in the CAI group compared to the coper and control groups. However, no significant difference was observed among the CAI and coper groups during normal single-leg landing. CONCLUSION: These results suggest prolonged FL latency and altered ankle kinematics suggest an increased risk of recurrent lateral ankle sprains in CAI with inversion single-leg landing.