Luminescent Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Probes to Study Transfection.

Affiliation

Zimmermann A(1), Jaber QZ(2), Koch J(3), Riebe S(1), Vallet C(4), Loza K(5), Hayduk M(1), Steinbuch KB(2), Knauer SK(4), Fridman M(2), Voskuhl J(1).
Author information:
(1)Faculty of chemistry
(Organic Chemistry) and, Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen
(CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstrasse 7, 45117, Essen, Germany.
(2)School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 6997801, Israel.
(3)Center for Medical Biotechnology
(ZMB), University of Duisburg Essen, Universitätsstrasse 2, 45141, Essen, Germany.
(4)Institute for Molecular Biology, Centre for Medical Biotechnology
(ZMB), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstrasse 2, 45117, Essen, Germany.
(5)Inorganic Chemistry and Centre for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen
(CeNIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätsstrasse 7, 45141, Essen, Germany.

Abstract

We report the characterization of amphiphilic aminoglycoside conjugates containing luminophores with aggregation-induced emission properties as transfection reagents. These inherently luminescent transfection vectors are capable of binding plasmid DNA through electrostatic interactions; this binding results in an emission "on" signal due to restriction of intramolecular motion of the luminophore core. The luminescent cationic amphiphiles effectively transferred plasmid DNA into mammalian cells (HeLa, HEK 293T), as proven by expression of a red fluorescent protein marker. The morphologies of the aggregates were investigated by microscopy as well as ζ-potential and dynamic light-scattering measurements. The transfection efficiencies using luminescent cationic amphiphiles were similar to that of the gold-standard transfection reagent Lipofectamine® 2000.