Nanomaterials for Antiangiogenic Therapies for Cancer: A Promising Tool for Personalized Medicine.

Affiliation

Alsaab HO(1)(2), Al-Hibs AS(3), Alzhrani R(1), Alrabighi KK(4), Alqathama A(5), Alwithenani A(6), Almalki AH(2)(7), Althobaiti YS(2)(8).
Author information:
(1)Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Taif University, P.O. Box 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia.
(2)Addiction and Neuroscience Research Unit, Taif University, P.O. Box 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia.
(3)Department of Pharmacy, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh 11564, Saudi Arabia.
(4)Batterjee Medical College for Sciences and Technology, Jeddah 21577, Saudi Arabia.
(5)Department of Pharmacognosy, Pharmacy College, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah 21955, Saudi Arabia.
(6)Department of Laboratory Medicine, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah 21955, Saudi Arabia.
(7)Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Taif University, P.O. Box 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia.
(8)Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Taif University, P.O. Box 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Angiogenesis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Several studies have shown that vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) plays a leading role in angiogenesis progression. Antiangiogenic medication has gained substantial recognition and is commonly administered in many forms of human cancer, leading to a rising interest in cancer therapy. However, this treatment method can lead to a deteriorating outcome of resistance, invasion, distant metastasis, and overall survival relative to its cytotoxicity. Furthermore, there are significant obstacles in tracking the efficacy of antiangiogenic treatments by incorporating positive biomarkers into clinical settings. These shortcomings underline the essential need to identify additional angiogenic inhibitors that target numerous angiogenic factors or to develop a new method for drug delivery of current inhibitors. The great benefits of nanoparticles are their potential, based on their specific properties, to be effective mechanisms that concentrate on the biological system and control various important functions. Among various therapeutic approaches, nanotechnology has emerged as a new strategy for treating different cancer types. This article attempts to demonstrate the huge potential for targeted nanoparticles and their molecular imaging applications. Notably, several nanoparticles have been developed and engineered to demonstrate antiangiogenic features. This nanomedicine could effectively treat a number of cancers using antiangiogenic therapies as an alternative approach. We also discuss the latest antiangiogenic and nanotherapeutic strategies and highlight tumor vessels and their microenvironments.