Phage Biobank: Present Challenges and Future Perspectives.

Affiliation

Lin RC(1), Sacher JC(2), Ceyssens PJ(3), Zheng J(4), Khalid A(5), Iredell JR(6); Australian Phage Biobanking Network.
Author information:
(1)Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)Phage Directory, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)Antibiotics and Resistance Unit, The National Reference Centres for Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria, Neisseria and Mycobacteria, Sciensano, Belgium.
(4)Phage Directory, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Electronic address: [Email]
(5)Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
(6)Centre for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

After a century of use in human infection, the preparation and administration of therapeutic bacteriophages (phages) still relies on ad hoc partnerships of researchers, biotech companies, clinicians and regulators. There is a clear need to improve the reproducibility, safety and speed of the provision of suitable phages. Here we discuss the specific characteristics and challenges of a sustainable phage biobank and, as we build a national consortium aimed at delivering phage therapeutics, suggest a roadmap toward national biobanking and phage therapy initiatives using the Australian context as a model.