Prebiotic dietary fibre intervention improves fecal markers related to inflammation in obese patients: results from the Food4Gut randomized placebo-controlled trial.

Affiliation

Neyrinck AM(#)(1), Rodriguez J(#)(1), Zhang Z(2), Seethaler B(3), Sánchez CR(1), Roumain M(4), Hiel S(1), Bindels LB(1), Cani PD(1)(5), Paquot N(6), Cnop M(7)(8), Nazare JA(9), Laville M(9), Muccioli GG(4), Bischoff SC(3), Walter J(2)(10), Thissen JP(11), Delzenne NM(12).
Author information:
(1)Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, UCLouvain, Université catholique de Louvain, avenue E. Mounier box B1.73.11, B-1200, Brussels, Belgium.
(2)Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
(3)Institute of Nutritional Medicine, University of Hohenheim, Hohenheim, Germany.
(4)Bioanalysis and Pharmacology of Bioactive Lipids Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, UCLouvain, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
(5)WELBIO- Walloon Excellence in Life Sciences and Biotechnology, UCLouvain, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
(6)Laboratory of Diabetology, Nutrition and Metabolic Disease, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium.
(7)ULB Center for Diabetes Research, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
(8)Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
(9)Rhône-Alpes Research Center for Human Nutrition, Université-Lyon, CarMeN Laboratory, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.
(10)Department of Medicine, and School of Microbiology, APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
(11)Pole of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, UCLouvain, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
(12)Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, UCLouvain, Université catholique de Louvain, avenue E. Mounier box B1.73.11, B-1200, Brussels, Belgium. [Email]
(#)Contributed equally

Abstract

PURPOSE: Inulin-type fructans (ITF) are prebiotic dietary fibre (DF) that may confer beneficial health effects, by interacting with the gut microbiota. We have tested the hypothesis that a dietary intervention promoting inulin intake versus placebo influences fecal microbial-derived metabolites and markers related to gut integrity and inflammation in obese patients. METHODS: Microbiota (16S rRNA sequencing), long- and short-chain fatty acids (LCFA, SCFA), bile acids, zonulin, and calprotectin were analyzed in fecal samples obtained from obese patients included in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants received either 16 g/d native inulin (prebiotic n = 12) versus maltodextrin (placebo n = 12), coupled to dietary advice to consume inulin-rich versus inulin-poor vegetables for 3 months, in addition to dietary caloric restriction. RESULTS: Both placebo and prebiotic interventions lowered energy and protein intake. A substantial increase in Bifidobacterium was detected after ITF treatment (q = 0.049) supporting our recent data obtained in a larger cohort. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin, a marker of gut inflammation, was reduced upon ITF treatment. Both prebiotic and placebo interventions increased the ratio of tauro-conjugated/free bile acids in feces. Prebiotic treatment did not significantly modify fecal SCFA content but it increased fecal rumenic acid, a conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 CLA) with immunomodulatory properties, that correlated notably to the expansion of Bifidobacterium (p = 0.031; r = 0.052). CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that ITF-prebiotic intake during 3 months decreases a fecal marker of intestinal inflammation in obese patients. Our data point to a potential contribution of microbial lipid-derived metabolites in gastro-intestinal dysfunction related to obesity. CLINICALTRIALS. GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT03852069 (February 22, 2019 retrospectively, registered).