Predicting the quality of life based on pain dimensions and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Painful diabetic neuropathy: a cross-sectional prevalence study in Iranian patients.

Affiliation

Davoudi M(1), Rezaei P(2), Rajaeiramsheh F(3), Ahmadi SM(4), Taheri AA(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. [Email]
(2)Department of Clinical Psychology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran.
(3)Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. [Email]
(4)Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences
(YUMS), Yasouj, Iran.
(5)Department of Counseling, Faculty of Behavioral Science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to predict the quality of life (QOL) in patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN) based on pain severity, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance. Also, this study was aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in Iranian patients with PDN. METHOD: 1120 patients (mean age, 53.6 ± 12.6 years) participated in the research. Data were collected by the Quality of life questionnaire (NeuroQoL); Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, the visual analog scale for pain severity, Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Finally, the data were analyzed using SPSS-26 by multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: The results showed the regression models' significance, and the dependent variables predicted 42% of total changes in the QOL. The most significant predicting factors were depression, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain severity, sleep disturbance, and anxiety in order. In patients with PDN, the prevalence of sleep disturbances, depression, and anxiety were 85.5%, 68.2%, and 62.1%, respectively. Also, comorbid depression and anxiety were found in 47% of patients. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrated a significant relationship between pain-related and psychiatric dimensions with QOL. Thus, it is suggested to design more specific psychological-based rehabilitation interventions in which these variables are considered. They should focus on more significant variables (such as depression and pain catastrophizing) to reach better treatment outcomes. Furthermore, this research shows a high level of anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance in Iranian patients with PDN. Thus, experts and clinicians are suggested to focus on reducing these psychiatric symptoms.