Psychoactive Substance Use and Its Associated Factors among Truck Drivers in Ethiopia.

Affiliation

Yosef T(1), Getachew D(1), Bogale B(1), Wondimu W(1), Shifera N(1), Negesse Y(1), Zewudie A(2), Niguse W(3), Tesfaw A(4), Gerensea H(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia.
(2)Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia.
(3)Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan Teferi, Ethiopia.
(4)Department of Public Health, College of Medicine Health Science, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia.
(5)School of Nursing, College of Health Science, Axum University, Axum, Ethiopia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Road traffic accidents (RTAs) remain an important public health issue worldwide. Psychoactive substance use is one of the main contributors to the occurrence of traffic accidents, and its use by truck drivers is a global problem. Also, psychoactive substance use is a commonly observed behavior among truck drivers. To the best of our knowledge, no evidence shows the prevalence and factors associated with psychoactive substance use among truck drivers in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was aimed at assessing the prevalence and factors associated with psychoactive substance use among truck drivers in Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 400 systematically selected truck drivers at Modjo dry port in Ethiopia, from February 1 to March 1, 2018. The data were collected through face-to-face individual interviews using a structured questionnaire. The collected data were entered into EpiData version 4.2.0.0 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Binary logistic regression analysis was computed to determine the association using crude and adjusted odds ratios at 95% confidence intervals. The level of significance was declared at p value < 0.05 in the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of the 400 truck drivers interviewed, the overall one-month self-reported prevalence of psychoactive substance use was 70% (n = 280). In the multivariable binary logistic regression analysis, aged 38 years and above (AOR = 0.40, 95% CI [0.23-0.69]), Christianity religion (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI [0.28-0.97]), college and university education (AOR = 3.47, 95% CI [1.27-9.47]), having a family size of 3 or more (AOR = 0.34, 95% CI [0.20-0.60]), having 6 or more hours spent sleeping at night (AOR = 0.46, 95% CI [0.28-0.75]), and rest breaks between driving (AOR = 2.13, 95% CI [1.14-3.97]) were significantly associated with psychoactive substance use. CONCLUSION: The one-month prevalence of psychoactive substance use among truck drivers was remarkably high. We can conclude that psychoactive substance use is a public health problem among truck drivers, which is a major threat to themselves and others on the road. The sociodemographic and occupational factors are the factors associated with drivers' psychoactive substance use. Therefore, devising health education and counseling program for drivers to tackle the problem plays paramount importance.