Recommendations for enhancing collaboration between the Canadian emergency department quality improvement and research communities.

Affiliation

Chartier LB(1)(2), Douglas SL(3)(4), Tawadrous D(5)(6), Stang AS(7)(8), Vaillancourt S(6)(9), Nasser L(10), Hrymak C(11)(12), Calder L(13)(14), Perry JJ(13)(14), McRae A(8)(15).
Author information:
(1)Department of Emergency Medicine, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth St., RFE-GS-480, Toronto, ON, M5G 2C4, Canada. [Email]
(2)Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. [Email]
(3)Department of Critical Care Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
(4)Department of Emergency Medicine, Kingston Health Sciences Center, Kingston, ON, Canada.
(5)Department of Emergency Medicine, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth St., RFE-GS-480, Toronto, ON, M5G 2C4, Canada.
(6)Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
(7)Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
(8)Department of Emergency Medicine, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
(9)Department of Emergency Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
(10)Division of Emergency Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
(11)Department of Emergency Medicine, Section of Critical Care, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
(12)Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Critical Care, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
(13)Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
(14)Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
(15)Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: While quality improvement (QI) and clinical research embody two distinct scientific approaches, they have the same ultimate goal-to improve health and patient care outcomes. By leveraging their respective strengths there is a higher likelihood of achieving and sustaining health improvements. Our objective was to create recommendations to enhance the collaboration of the Canadian emergency medicine QI and clinical research communities. METHODS: An expert panel of eight ED clinicians with diverse QI and clinical research expertise drafted a list of recommendations based on their professional expertise and a scoping review of the literature. These recommendations were refined through consultation with national stakeholders and reviewed at the 2020 CAEP Virtual Academic Symposium, where feedback was received through several virtual platforms. RESULTS: The final six recommendations include that all emergency medicine providers should: (1) understand the role and application of both clinical research and QI science; that academic emergency medicine physicians should: (2) contribute to both local adoption and broad dissemination of project findings, (3) leverage QI methodologies in research projects to improve knowledge translation, and (4) ensure that project outcomes prioritize patient care; and that academic leaders should: (5) enhance the infrastructure for oversight of research and QI projects, and (6) encourage collaboration between researchers and QI experts by ensuring that academic and operational infrastructures align and support both. CONCLUSION: Six recommendations are presented to help the Canadian emergency medicine community achieve greater collaboration between researchers and QI experts with the ultimate goal of improving patient care outcomes.