Relationship of patient-centered communication and cancer risk information avoidance: A social cognitive perspective.

Affiliation

Yu L(1), Zheng F(2), Xiong J(3), Wu X(4).
Author information:
(1)School of Medicine and Health Management, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan, China. Electronic address: [Email]
(2)School of Medicine and Health Management, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan, China. Electronic address: [Email]
(3)Department of Strategy, Entrepreneurship & International Business, ESSCA School of Management, 49003 Angers, France. Electronic address: [Email]
(4)School of Medicine and Health Management, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430030 Wuhan, China. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We examined the relationship between patient-centered communication and cancer risk information avoidance and estimated the mediating role of self-efficacy in this relationship. METHODS: Using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 2033), this study aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between patient-centered communication and cancer risk information avoidance via correlation analysis, stepwise regression models, and mediation analysis. RESULTS: Patient-centered communication was significantly negatively associated with cancer risk information avoidance (β= -0.09, p < 0.01) after controlling for gender, income, education, and cancer risk perception. Self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship of patient-centered communication with cancer risk information avoidance. CONCLUSION: Patient-centered communication can improve patients' self-efficacy, thereby preventing them from avoiding cancer risk information. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The negative relationship between patient-centered communication and cancer risk information avoidance substantiates that improving patient-centered communication is a promising approach to support caregivers in their activities, reduce patients' subjective cancer burden, and even improve their health. To address cancer-related issues, policymakers can consider interventions from the external environment and internal personal cognition perspectives.