Risk Factors of Coronavirus Disease 2019-Related Mortality and Optimal Treatment Regimens: A Retrospective Study.

Affiliation

Wang Y(1), Yao S(2), Liu X(3), Cao Y(4), Wang Y(5), Xie M(6).
Author information:
(1)Department of Pediatrics, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Yiwu, Zhejiang, China
(mainland).
(2)Cancer Prevention Office, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
(mainland).
(3)Department of Endocrinology, Liyuan Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Since and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
(mainland).
(4)Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
(mainland).
(5)Wuhan Institution for Tuberculosis Control, Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, China
(mainland).
(6)Department of Orthopedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China
(mainland).

Abstract

BACKGROUND Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly worldwide, and scientists are trying to find a way to overcome the disease. We explored the risk factors that influence patient outcomes, including treatment regimens, which can provide a reference for further treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective cohort study analysis was performed using data from 97 patients with COVID-19 who visited Wuhan Union Hospital from February 2020 to March 2020. We collected data on demographics, comorbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatment methods, outcomes, and complications. Patients were divided into a recovered group and a deceased group. We compared the differences between the 2 groups and analyzed risk factors influencing the treatment effect. RESULTS Seventy-six patients recovered and 21 died. The average age and body mass index (BMI) of the deceased group were significantly higher than those of the recovered group (69.81±6.80 years vs 60.79±11.28 years, P<0.001 and 24.95±3.14 kg/m² vs 23.09±2.97 kg/m², P=0.014, respectively). The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with the lowest mortality (P<0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that age, BMI, H-CRP, shock, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were independent risk factors for patients with COVID-19 (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Elderly patients and those with a high BMI, as well as patients who experience shock and ARDS, may have a higher risk of death from COVID-19. The combination of antiviral drugs and supportive therapy appears to be associated with lower mortality, although further research is needed.