Risk assessment and management among frontline nurses in the context of the COVID-19 virus in the northern region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Affiliation

Albaqawi HM(1), Pasay-An E(2), Mostoles R Jr(1), Villareal S(1).
Author information:
(1)Deparment of Medical-Surgical, College of Nursing, University of Hail, Applied Health Sciences Building, Building 9, Altqutta, Alqutta Road, Hail City, Saudi Arabia.
(2)Maternal and Child Department, College of Nursing, University of Hail, Applied Health Sciences Building, Building 9, Altqutta, Alqutta Road, Hail City, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the post-contact risk of nurses who provide care for patients diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: This investigation employed a quantitative-descriptive design. The study sample was comprised of the frontline nurses in the COVID-19 center hospitals in the northern part of Saudi Arabia. Snowball sampling was used, resulting in 80 frontline nurses. A survey using a self-administered questionnaire in a Google form was employed to collect the data, which was collected from May 20 through June 25, 2020. RESULTS: Some of the study participants were reported to have a history of both staying in the same household with each other (35%) and of traveling with a confirmed COVID-19 patient (20%). These participants were considered as community exposed to COVID-19. There were 8.8% who were classified as high risk due to failure in removing and replacing personal protective equipment (PPE); 6.3% were at high risk for not performing hand hygiene before and after touching COVID-19 patients, and 5% did not follow the recommended guidelines in performing hand hygiene after touching the patients' surroundings. In addition, 3.8% of the participants had an accident related to biological material, such as with splashes of biological fluid (in the eyes). These nurses were classified as high risk for COVID-19 virus infection, CONCLUSION: This study identifies practices that need improvement in combatting this virus. Since policies and guidelines may not always be optimal in all settings, a tailor-fitted guideline is appropriate. Nurse leaders, for example, need to establish an infection control system that provides real-time monitoring and facilitates immediate correction for nurses. Doing so will provide the nurses with a continuous awareness of predisposing themselves to acquiring the virus.