Rotavirus genotype trends from 2013 to 2018 and vaccine effectiveness in southern Vietnam.

Affiliation

Truong DTT(1), Kang JM(2), Tran NTH(3), Phan LT(4), Nguyen HT(5), Ho TV(6), Nguyen TTT(7), Hoang PL(3), Pham TMT(7), Nguyen TD(6), Hoang TA(6), Luong QC(6), Pham QD(8), Ahn JG(2), Yoon S(9), Nguyen TV(10), Yeom JS(11).
Author information:
(1)Department for Disease Control and Prevention, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Department of Global Health Security, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.
(2)Department of Paediatrics, Severance Children's Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Institute for Immunology and Immunological Diseases, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
(3)Department of Gastroenterology, Children's Hospital 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(4)Directorial Board, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(5)Directorial Board, Children's Hospital 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(6)Department for Disease Control and Prevention, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(7)Microbiology and Immunology Department, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(8)Planning Division, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; Training Centre, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
(9)Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.
(10)Directorial Board, Pasteur Institute, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Electronic address: [Email]
(11)Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Rotavirus (RV) genotypes vary geographically, and this can affect vaccine effectiveness (VE). This study investigated the genotype distribution of RV and explored VE before introducing the RV vaccine to the national immunization programme in Vietnam. METHODS: This hospital-based surveillance study was conducted at Children's Hospital 1, Ho Chi Minh City in 2013-2018. Stool samples and relevant data, including vaccination history, were collected from children aged <5 years who were hospitalized with gastroenteritis. RV was detected using enzyme immunoassays and then genotyped. Children aged ≥6 months were included in the VE analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 5176 children were included in this study. RV was detected in 2421 children (46.8%). RV positivity decreased over the study period and was associated with age, seasonality, location and previous vaccination. Among 1105 RV-positive samples, G3P[8] was the most prevalent genotype (43.1%), followed by G8P[8] (19.7%), G1P[8] (12.9%) and G2P[4] (12.9%). Overall VE was 69.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 53.3-80.6%] in fully vaccinated children and 58.6% (95% CI 44.1-69.4%) in children who had received at least one dose of RV vaccine. VE was highest for G3P[8] (95% CI 75.1-84.5%) and lowest for G2P[4] (95% CI 32.4-57.2%). CONCLUSIONS: RV remains a major cause of acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in southern Vietnam. The RV vaccine is effective, but its effectiveness varies with RV genotype.