Sea surface temperature variability and ischemic heart disease outcomes among older adults.

Affiliation

Majeed H(1)(2), Moineddin R(3)(4), Booth GL(5)(6)(4)(7).
Author information:
(1)Institute of Medical Science, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A8, Canada. [Email]
(2)MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, 209 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, M5B 1T8, Canada. [Email]
(3)Department of Family and Community Medicine, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 1V7, Canada.
(4)Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Heath, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5T 1P8, Canada.
(5)Institute of Medical Science, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A8, Canada.
(6)MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St Michael's Hospital, Unity Health Toronto, 209 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, M5B 1T8, Canada.
(7)Department of Medicine, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A8, Canada.

Abstract

Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. While extreme summer surface air temperatures are thought to be a risk factor for IHD, it is unclear whether large-scale climate patterns also influence this risk. This multi-national population-based study investigated the association between summer Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) variability and annual acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or IHD event rates among older adults residing in North America and the United Kingdom. Overall, a shift from cool to warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) was associated with reduced AMI admissions in western Canada (adjusted rate ratio [RR] 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.99), where this climate pattern predominatly forces below-normal cloud cover and precipitation during summertime, and increased AMI deaths in western United States (RR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.15), where it forces increased cloud cover and precipitation. Whereas, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) during a strong positive phase was associated with reduced AMI admissions in eastern Canada (RR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98) and increased IHD mortality during summer months in the United Kingdom (RR 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.14). These findings suggest that SST variability can be used to predict changes in cardiovascular event rates in regions that are susceptible.