Stakeholder consensus for decision making in eye-gaze control technology for children, adolescents and adults with cerebral palsy service provision: findings from a Delphi study.

Affiliation

Karlsson P(1), Griffiths T(2)(3), Clarke MT(3), Monbaliu E(4), Himmelmann K(5), Bekteshi S(4), Allsop A(6), Pereksles R(7), Galea C(6), Wallen M(8).
Author information:
(1)Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Institute, Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, The University of Sydney, Frenchs Forest, PO Box 6427, Sydney, NSW, 2086, Australia. [Email]
(2)Cambridge University Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.
(3)Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK.
(4)KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences Campus Bruges, Bruges, Belgium.
(5)Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
(6)Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Institute, Discipline of Child and Adolescent Health, The University of Sydney, Frenchs Forest, PO Box 6427, Sydney, NSW, 2086, Australia.
(7)Cerebral Palsy Alliance, Sydney, Australia.
(8)School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited research exists to guide clinical decisions about trialling, selecting, implementing and evaluating eye-gaze control technology. This paper reports on the outcomes of a Delphi study that was conducted to build international stakeholder consensus to inform decision making about trialling and implementing eye-gaze control technology with people with cerebral palsy. METHODS: A three-round online Delphi survey was conducted. In Round 1, 126 stakeholders responded to questions identified through an international stakeholder Advisory Panel and systematic reviews. In Round 2, 63 respondents rated the importance of 200 statements generated by in Round 1. In Round 3, 41 respondents rated the importance of the 105 highest ranked statements retained from Round 2. RESULTS: Stakeholders achieved consensus on 94 of the original 200 statements. These statements related to person factors, support networks, the environment, and technical aspects to consider during assessment, trial, implementation and follow-up. Findings reinforced the importance of an individualised approach and that information gathered from the user, their support network and professionals are central when measuring outcomes. Information required to support an application for funding was obtained. CONCLUSION: This Delphi study has identified issues which are unique to eye-gaze control technology and will enhance its implementation with people with cerebral palsy.