TMT-based quantitative proteomics analyses of sterile/fertile anthers from a genic male-sterile line and its maintainer in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

Affiliation

Chen Z(1), Zhong W(1), Chen S(1), Zhou Y(1), Ji P(1), Gong Y(1), Yang Z(1), Mao Z(1), Zhang C(1), Mu F(2).
Author information:
(1)Industrial Crop Research Institute, Sichuan Academy of Agricultural Science, No.159 Huajin Avanue, Qingbaijiang District, Chengdu 610300, China.
(2)Industrial Crop Research Institute, Sichuan Academy of Agricultural Science, No.159 Huajin Avanue, Qingbaijiang District, Chengdu 610300, China. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Genetic male sterility (GMS) in cotton is important for utilization of heterosis. However, the molecular mechanism of GMS is poorly known. In this study, cytological and proteomics analyses of anthers were conducted in three stages (stage 3 to 5) between GMS line (GA18) and its maintainer (GA18M). The cross-section observation revealed that the tapetal layer in stage 3 was thinner in GA18 compared to GA18M, and the tapetum cells did not degrade in stage 4 in GA18, thus providing no material for microspore development. A total of 1952 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were identified between GA18 and GA18M anthers. They were annotated to 52 gene ontology (GO) terms and enriched in 115 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, which formed several complex regulator networks, and dozens of important nodes were identified. Moreover, DEPs were also identified between two consecutive stages of GA18 and GA18M, with functional analyses indicating that numerous developmental differences existed between fertile and sterile anthers. The metabolic pathways were significantly altered, including decreased carbohydrate metabolism, ribosome defects, disturbed protein synthesis, disrupted flavonoids synthesis, etc., that may be involved in male sterility. Overall, these results provide genetic resources that help decipher the molecular mechanisms behind GMS. SIGNIFICANCE: Male sterility is a common phenomenon in flowering plant species, and plays a role in the application of heterosis. However, the molecular mechanism of it remains to be elucidated. Using cytological and proteomics approaches, we found that the tapetal layer development retardation may be the reason of male sterility, which was different from the delayed degradation described in previous studies. More than one thousand differentially expressed proteins were identified between male sterile line and its maintainer, forming a complex regulatory network, and the key nodes were remarked that could be used as candidate proteins related to male sterility in future study. Dozens of metabolic pathways were significantly altered, among them, ribosome defects was a novel pathway that may be involved in male sterility. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism governing male sterility and lay a foundation for clone of genes association with male sterility.