Tele-Mental Health Utilization Among People with Mental Illness to Access Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Affiliation

Costa M(1), Reis G(2), Pavlo A(2), Bellamy C(2), Ponte K(2)(3), Davidson L(2).
Author information:
(1)Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Program for Recovery and Community Health. New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA. [Email]
(2)Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Program for Recovery and Community Health. New Haven, New Haven, CT, USA.
(3)ForLikeMinds, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Shortly after the COVID-19 pandemic arrived at the United States, mental health services moved towards using tele-mental health to provide care. A survey about resilience and tele-mental health was developed and conducted with ForLikeMinds' members and followers. Correlational analysis was used to examine relationships between quantitative variables. A phenomenological approach was used to analyze open questions responses. Sixteen percent of participants were coping well with the pandemic; 50% were coping okay; and 34% said that they were coping poorly. Three main themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: accessibility to care; self-care strategies; and community support and relationship. The responses from participants seems to reflect the combination of two main factors-the challenges they were facing in accessing care through tele-mental health plus the mental health consequences from COVID-19. This survey reflects the importance of building innovative strategies to create a working alliance with people who need care through tele-mental health.