The Association of Oral Health Status and socio-economic determinants with Oral Health-Related Quality of Life among the elderly: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Affiliation

Baniasadi K(1), Armoon B(2), Higgs P(3), Bayat AH(2), Mohammadi Gharehghani MA(4), Hemmat M(2), Fakhri Y(5), Mohammadi R(6), Fattah Moghaddam L(7), Schroth RJ(8).
Author information:
(1)Department of Cognitive Psychology, Institute for Cognitive Science Studies, Pardis, Iran.
(2)Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Saveh University of Medical Sciences, Saveh, Iran.
(3)Department of Public Health, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
(4)Social Welfare Management Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
(5)Food Health Research Center, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran.
(6)Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Nutrition, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran.
(7)Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran Medical Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
(8)Dr. Gerald Niznick College of Dentistry, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between poor Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) and oral health determinants (eg being 75 years of age or greater, marital status, smoking status, denture wearing, depression, low educational level (≤8th grade), poor general health, caries history, tooth-induced pain, decayed, missing filled teeth (DMFT) scores and periodontal diseases) among the elderly. METHODS: Formal search strategies in PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane and Web of Science were performed to identify studies in English published before 1 December 2019. We assessed the impacts of the oral health determinants including being 75 years of age or greater, marital status, smoking status, denture wearing, depression, low educational level (≤8th grade), poor general health, caries history, tooth-induced pain, DMFT scores and periodontal diseases) on OHRQoL among elderly individuals. The data were analysed using Stata 12.0 software. RESULTS: In total, 19 publications met the inclusion criteria of this meta-analysis. Findings indicate a positive association between low educational level (ie ≤8th grade), marital status, depression, smoking status, denture wearing, poor general health, tooth-induced pain, periodontal diseases and poor OHRQoL among the elderly. We also observed a negative association between DMFT, being older than 75 years of age on poor OHRQoL among the elderly. CONCLUSIONS: This review identified that several oral health determinants were associated with poor OHRQoL. The efficacy of preventive measures and the economic aspects of tooth replacement approaches should be explored in the future. Developing oral healthcare plans and policies with the specific aim of improving OHRQoL among this group is essential.