The evolution of the serial transverse enteroplasty for pediatric short bowel syndrome at a single institution.

Affiliation

The Group for Improvement of Intestinal Function and Treatment (GIFT), The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA; Division of General and Thoracic Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA; Transplant and Regenerative Medicine Center, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE : The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) tapers and lengthens the gut to improve adaptation. Mortality has decreased with multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation programs (IRP) allowing more time to reach adaptive potential. We reviewed our STEP experience to compare surgical outcomes between early and late eras of our IRP.
METHODS : A retrospective cohort study of all STEP patients managed by our IRP (Jan 2003-Dec 2016; era 1 2003-2005, era 2 2006-2016) was completed. Patient demographics, operative data, complications, and outcome data were collected. Univariate analysis between eras with nonparametric statistics was performed.
RESULTS : Thirty-six patients received STEP (Era 1 = 12; Era 2 = 24) [median age 5mo; males 22/36 (61.1%)]. In Era 2 a higher proportion had gastroschisis (8.3% vs 58.3%); p = 0.004) and shorter pre-STEP small bowel remnant (48 vs 111 cm, p = 0.001). The median increase in bowel length post-STEP was 52.9%. Overall, 42% of patients reached enteral autonomy (Era 1 7/12 (58%) vs Era 2 8/24 (33%); p = 0.15). Median time to PN discontinuation was shorter in Era 1 (259 vs 968 days, p = .208). Staple line complications were higher in Era 1 (16.7% vs 0%; p = 0.040).
CONCLUSIONS : Presently, STEP is reserved for a specific subset of IRP patients, allowing 42% to wean off PN. STEP's use should be under the umbrella of a multidisciplinary IRP.
METHODS : Retrospective cohort study.
METHODS : III.

Keywords

Intestinal failure,Parenteral nutrition,Pediatrics,Short bowel syndrome,Surgery,

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