The relationship between fluoride accumulation in tea plant and changes in leaf cell wall structure and composition under different fluoride conditions.

Affiliation

Luo J(1), Ni D(1), Li C(2), Du Y(1), Chen Y(3).
Author information:
(1)Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology, Ministry of Education & Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture in Central China, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Horticulture & Forestry Sciences, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070, China.
(2)College of Agronomy, Weifang University of Science & Technology, Shouguang, 262700, China.
(3)Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology, Ministry of Education & Key Laboratory of Urban Agriculture in Central China, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Horticulture & Forestry Sciences, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070, China. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Tea plant is capable of hyper-accumulating fluoride (F) in leaves, suggesting drinking tea may cause excessive F intake in our body and threaten the health. This study investigated the changes in the structure, composition, and F content in the leaf cell wall of the tea (Camellia sinensis) under different F conditions to demonstrate the role of cell wall in F enrichment in tea plants. The cell wall was shown as the main part for F accumulation (67%-92%), with most of F distributed in the pectin fraction (56%-71%). With increasing F concentration, a significant increase (p < 0.05) was observed in the F content of cell wall and its components, the level of cell wall metal ions (i.e. Cu, Mg, Zn, Al, Ca, Ba, Mn), as well as the content of total cell wall materials, cellulose, and pectin. Meanwhile, the level of Cu, Mg, Zn, pectin, and cellulose was significantly positively correlated with the F content in the leaf cell wall. F addition was shown to increase the fluorescence intensity of LM19 and 2F4 antibody-labeled low-methylesterified homogalacturonans (HGs), while decrease LM20-labeled high-methylesterified HGs, coupled with an increase in the activity and gene expression of pectin methyl esterases (PMEs) in tea leaves. All these results suggest that F addition can increase pectin content and demethylesterification, leading to increased absorption of metal cations and chelation of F in the cell wall through the action of metal ions.