An inverted U-shaped relationship between parathyroid hormone and body weight, body mass index, body fat.

Affiliation

Yuan TJ(1)(2), Chen LP(3), Pan YL(4), Lu Y(3), Sun LH(1)(2), Zhao HY(1)(2), Wang WQ(1)(2), Tao B(5)(6), Liu JM(7)(8).
Author information:
(1)Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai, China.
(2)National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases
(Shanghai), Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of the National Health Commission of the PR China, Shanghai National Center for Translational Medicine, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
(3)Department of Radiology, Rui-jin Hospital/Lu Wan Branch, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
(4)Department of Radiology, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, People's Hospital of Hangzhou Medical College, No. 158 Shang-tang Road, Hangzhou, 310004, Zhejiang, China.
(5)Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai, China. [Email]
(6)National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases
(Shanghai), Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of the National Health Commission of the PR China, Shanghai National Center for Translational Medicine, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. [Email]
(7)Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai, China. [Email]
(8)National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases
(Shanghai), Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of the National Health Commission of the PR China, Shanghai National Center for Translational Medicine, Rui-jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. [Email]

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and body weight, body mass index (BMI), lipid profiles, and fat distribution in subjects with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and controls. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in 192 patients with PHPT and 202 controls. Serum concentrations of calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), PTH, lipids profiles, and other hormones were quantified. Bone mineral density was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Fat distribution evaluation utilizing quantitative computed tomography was conducted in another 66 patients with PHPT and 155 controls. RESULTS: PHPT patients were older (P < 0.001) and had less body weight (P < 0.001), lower BMI (P = 0.019), lower serum concentrations of 25(OH)D (P < 0.001), total cholesterol (P = 0.036), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P = 0.036), and higher circulating concentration of free fatty acid (FFA) (P = 0.047) as compared with controls. After adjusting multiple confounders, PTH was positively correlated with weight (r = 0.311, P < 0.001), BMI (r = 0.268, P < 0.01), and visceral adipose tissue area (VAA) (r = 0.191, P < 0.05) in the first tertile of PTH. However, these associations were not observed in the second tertile. While in the third tertile, PTH was negatively correlated with weight (r = -0.200, P < 0.05), BMI (r = -0.223, P < 0.05) and marginally with VAA (r = -0.306, P = 0.065), it showed positive association with FFA (r = 0.230, P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The inverted U-shape relationship between PTH and body weight, BMI, VAA found in this study is helpful to explain the conflicting results among these parameters, and extend our understanding of the metabolic effects of PTH.

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