Cerebral microbleeds and their influence on cognitive impairment in Dialysis patients.

Affiliation

Qian Y(1), Zheng K(#)(2), Wang H(1), You H(3), Han F(4), Ni J(4), Hou B(3), Chen L(1), Zhu Y(4), Feng F(3), Li X(#)(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Nephrology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital
(East), No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.
(2)Department of Nephrology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital
(East), No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. [Email]
(3)Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital
(East), No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.
(4)Department of Neurology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital
(East), No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China.
(5)Department of Nephrology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Peking Union Medical College Hospital
(East), No. 1 Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. [Email]
(#)Contributed equally

Abstract

Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in dialysis patients have recently attracted much attention, and the different locations of CMBs indicate different pathological processes. Previous studies on the relationship between CMBs and cognitive impairment (CI) in the general population and in dialysis patients have reported controversial results. A total of 180 chronic dialysis patients were enrolled in our study. Based on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of CMBs, the patients were divided into 4 groups (without-CMBs group, strictly lobar group, strictly deep group, and mixed group). A wide range of cognitive tests was administered to evaluate cognitive function. The risk factors for CMBs were explored, and the correlation between CMB distribution and CI was investigated by regression analysis. The prevalence of CMBs was 32.8% in the total study population, 36.1% in the haemodialysis (HD) subgroup and 26.2% in the peritoneal dialysis (PD) PD subgroup. Sixteen subjects (8.9%) were classified as the lobar group, 12 subjects (6.7%) as the mixed group, and 31 subjects (17.2%) as the deep group. A significant association was shown between deep CMBs and impaired cognitive function, involving overall cognitive function, memory, language ability and executive function. Deep CMBs were significantly associated with dialysis vintage, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and lacunar infarcts number, while deep CMBs showed no correlation with dialysis modality and current heparin medication. Deep CMBs are closely associated with global and specific CI in dialysis patients. Blood pressure control may prevent deep CMBs and their associated CI.