Depression and quality of life among African Americans with epilepsy: Findings from the Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network integrated database.

Affiliation

Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 10524 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, United States of America. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Depression and worse quality of life (QOL) are significantly associated with epilepsy. However, limited descriptive data on depression and quality of life among African Americans with epilepsy are available. This study sought to describe the prevalence of depression among African Americans with epilepsy participating in self-management studies and to examine the relationship between depression and QOL. Using data from the Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) research network, a subgroup of African Americans with epilepsy were selected for the analytic sample. Descriptive statistics indicated the prevalence of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]) and reports of epilepsy-specific QOL (Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 [QOLIE-10]) in the sample. Multiple linear regression examined the relationship between depression and QOL while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and seizure frequency. The prevalence of depression (PHQ-9 ≥; 10) was 47.7%. Quality of life was the only variable significantly associated with depressive symptoms in multivariable analyses, suggesting that depressive symptoms have a stronger relationship with QOL than seizure frequency. With the high levels of depression and the significant relationship with QOL, regular screening of depression is needed among African Americans with epilepsy. Self-management programs that improve mood may also play an important role in improving the lives of African Americans with epilepsy.

Keywords

African Americans,Depression,Epilepsy,Quality of life,

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