Effect of High Influenza Activity on Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmias Requiring Therapy in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillators.

Affiliation

Department of Medicine, McGovern Medical School, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Influenza is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Influenza's association with ventricular arrhythmias (VAs) has not been adequately studied. We investigated the relation of seasonal influenza activity with the incidence of VAs requiring therapy in patients with an implantable cardiac defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator. We retrospectively studied 163,831 patients with an implantable cardiac defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator who were enrolled in the Abbott Medical Merlin.net remote-monitoring network between January 2009 and December 2015. We used cross-correlation to assess the temporal relationship between influenza activity and the incidence of VAs requiring shock or antitachycardia pacing (ATP). We used a generalized linear model to test the possible effect of seasonal influenza activity on the occurrence of VAs requiring shock or ATP treatment, after adjustment for within-patient effects, age, gender, device type, and calendar year. We found a significant correlation between influenza activity and the incidence of VAs requiring shock or ATP treatment. The multivariate generalized linear model showed that during high influenza activity, patients were more likely to have a VA treated with shock (odds ratio = 1.06, p < 0.001) or ATP (odds ratio = 1.06, p < 0.0001). The impact of high influenza activity was most prominent during the years 2014 and 2015. We conclude that high influenza activity is associated with increased risk of VAs requiring therapy.