Effects of Pregnancy, Outdoor Access, and Antifungal Medication on Hair Loss in Breeding-age Female Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina).

Affiliation

Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle Washington, Email: [Email]

Abstract

Over 18 mo, adult female pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina) housed at a breeding facility in Arizona were monitored every 6 mo for alopecia. The study period coincided with the movement of a majority of animals from primarily outdoor housing to continuous indoor housing and a corresponding decrease in available space. These changes were made due to the newly recognized prevalence of coccidioidomycosis at this site. The effects of pregnancy status, changes in outdoor access or space, and administration of fluconazole for the treatment of coccidioidomycosis on alopecia were explored. In this group of pigtailed macaques pregnancy did not appear to affect alopecia, in contrast to findings from a closely related species, rhesus macaques. Fluconazole administration increased alopecia in older animals but not in the youngest age group. Conversely, the effects of limited outdoor access or decreased space on increasing alopecia were greatest in the youngest group of animals.