Longitudinal microbiological evaluation of subclinical non-aureus staphylococcal intramammary infections in a lentivirus-infected dairy goat herd.

Author

Véronique Bernier Gosselin

Affiliation

Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, 900 East Campus Dr., Columbia, 65211, United States. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to 1) correlate pre-partum teat skin colonization with non-aureus staphylococcal (NAS) intramammary infection (IMI) in early lactation, and 2) evaluate infection dynamics of subclinical NAS IMI in goats during lactation in a small ruminant lentivirus-infected herd. Pre-partum teat skin swabs (41 goats, 82 halves) and post-partum half-level milk samples (106 goats, 203 halves) were collected at various intervals starting at ≤10 days in milk (DIM) until ≥120 DIM. Teat skin colonization and IMI were defined by culture and strain-typing. The association between the pre-kidding udder-half teat skin sample status and early lactation IMI status for a given species was investigated using McNemar's exact test or logistic regression. Time to IMI elimination and time to new IMI were evaluated by discrete-time survival analysis. Halves with S. caprae isolated from teat skin prior to kidding had increased odds of S. caprae IMI ≤ 10 DIM. Time to IMI elimination varied as a function of NAS species. Intramammary infections detected >10 DIM had a higher hazard of elimination (hazard ratio [HR] 5.6, 95% CI 2.8-11.2) than IMI detected ≤10 DIM. The presence of an IMI in the contralateral half was associated with a higher hazard of new IMI (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.4) in an uninfected half. Further studies on interventional strategies targeting early IMI and IMI caused by persistent species are warranted.

Keywords

Caprine,Mastitis,Persistence,Staphylococci,Subclinical,

OUR Recent Articles