Potential roles of natural products in the targeting of proteinopathic neurodegenerative diseases.

Affiliation

Dash R(1), Jahan I(2), Ali MC(3), Mitra S(1), Munni YA(1), Timalsina B(1), Hannan MA(4), Moon IS(5).
Author information:
(1)Department of Anatomy, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju, 38066, Republic of Korea.
(2)Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Life and Earth Sciences, Jagannath University, Dhaka, 1100, Bangladesh.
(3)Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Islamic University, Kushtia, 7003, Bangladesh.
(4)Department of Anatomy, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju, 38066, Republic of Korea; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, 2202, Bangladesh.
(5)Department of Anatomy, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju, 38066, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: [Email]

Abstract

Defective proteostasis is associated with the gradual accumulations of misfolded proteins and is a hallmark of many age-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In the aged brain, maintenance of the proteostasis network presents a substantial challenge, and its loss contributes to the onset and progression of neurological diseases associated with cognitive decline due to the generation of toxic protein aggregates, a process termed 'proteinopathy'. Emerging evidence suggests that reversing proteinopathies by boosting proteostasis might provide an effective means of preventing neurodegeneration. From this perspective, phytochemicals may play significant roles as potent modulators of the proteostasis network, as previous reports have suggested they can interact with various network components to modify pathologies and confer neuroprotection. This review focuses on some potent phytochemicals that directly or indirectly modulate the proteostasis network and on their possible molecular targets. In addition, we propose strategies for the natural product-based modulation of proteostasis machinery that target proteinopathies.