Spontaneous synchronous bilateral hemothorax as the only finding in primary pleural angiosarcoma: a case report and a literature review.

Affiliation

Levi G(1), Orzes N(2), Uccelli S(3), Cettolo F(4), Arici M(5), Ciarfaglia M(6), Fisogni S(7), Marchetti G(8), Rocchetti C(9).
Author information:
(1)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(2)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(3)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(4)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(5)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(6)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]
(7)Department of Molecular and Translational Medicine. University of Brescia and Pathology Unit, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia. [Email]
(8)Department of Pneumology, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia. [Email]
(9)Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia. [Email]

Abstract

Angiosarcoma is a rare malignancy of vascular origin, mostly originating from skin, soft tissues, and breast, but rarely also from the pleura. We present the case of a 55-year-old man who referred to our hospital for a spontaneous bilateral hemothorax. The CT angiography did not show any source of active bleeding; plus, no pleural or lung masses were observable. Cytological and microbiological analyses made on a sample of pleural fluid resulted negative. Despite numerous blood transfusions and thoracenteses, the patient deceased from hemorrhagic shock ten days later and the diagnosis of primary pleural epithelioid angiosarcoma was obtained only by autopsy. Additionally, we present a review of the literature about primary pleural angiosarcomas.