Translation and Validation of an Italian Language Version of the Religious Beliefs and Mental Illness Stigma Scale (I-RBMIS).

Affiliation

Pingani L(1)(2)(3), Giberti S(4), Coriani S(5), Ferrari S(4), Fierro L(6), Mattei G(4)(7), Nasi AM(5)(8), Pinelli G(9), Wesselmann ED(10), Galeazzi GM(4).
Author information:
(1)Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, "De Sanctis" Pavilion - "San Lazzaro" University Campus, Via Amendola 2, 42121, Reggio Emilia, Italy. [Email]
(2)Department of Health Professions, Azienda USL - IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy. [Email]
(3)Department of Mental Health, Azienda USL - IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy. [Email]
(4)Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, "De Sanctis" Pavilion - "San Lazzaro" University Campus, Via Amendola 2, 42121, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
(5)Department of Health Professions, Azienda USL - IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
(6)Department of Health Professions, Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale degli Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
(7)Marco Biagi Department of Economics and Marco Bigi Foundation, Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
(8)Department of Mental Health, Azienda USL - IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
(9)Department of the Arts, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
(10)Department of Psychology, Illinois State University, Normal, USA.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to validate the Italian version of the Religious Beliefs and Mental Illness Stigma Scale (I-RBMIS): a self-report measure of religious beliefs that may contribute to stigma regarding mental disorders. Scale validation included: linguistic validation; pilot test for understandability; face validity; factor analysis as test of dimensionality; Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test to evaluate sample sampling adequacy; internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha; scale validity was assessed through concurrent criterion validity using as gold standard the Italian version of Attribution Questionnaire 27 and mental health knowledge schedule; A total of 311 people agreed to participate in the study. Face validity showed that 13 items out of 16 were completely understandable while only three items (4, 9 and 13) highlighted small lexical concerns. The average compilation time was under 4 min. Bartlett's test for sphericity was statistically significant (Χ2 = 1497.54; df = 120; p < 0.001). Cronbach's alpha values were acceptable both for the entire questionnaire (0.80) and for the morality/sin subscale (0.73), whereas it was slightly below the standard cutoff for the spiritually oriented causes/treatments (0.68). Scale validity showed a positive correlation between I-RBMIS and AQ-27-I, and a negative correlation between I-RBMIS and MAKS-I. I-RBMIS demonstrated good psychometric properties to assess stigmatizing religious beliefs toward mental illness in general population.